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know-the-facts/the-science/alcohol-lingo


August 22nd, 2018

Category: General

As you can see there are clearly various different stages of alcohol misuse.

One question that we have had from you is, how would you define an alcoholic?

You would be forgiven for not knowing the definition of an alcoholic. There are so many out there. Which is one of the reasons why it can be difficult to associate with that label.

         Oxford dictionary: The Oxford dictionary keeps this simple. A person suffering from alcoholism.

Quitalcohol.com: Says, an alcoholic is a person who suffers from the disease of alcoholism. His or her brain has become dependent on alcohol to function, and without a drink, withdrawal symptoms occur.

Drinkaware: Interestingly Drinkaware look at the definition of the illness rather than looking to label the person. An approach we support at the DRiNKLiNK HQ.

         Alcoholism is the most serious form of problem drinking, and describes a strong, often uncontrollable, desire to drink. Sufferers of alcoholism will often place drinking above all other obligations, including work and family, and may build up a physical tolerance or experience withdrawal symptoms if they stop.

Anonymous: One of our favourite definitions, which is currently undocumented, is to be an alcoholic or to have an alcohol problem is relevant to anyone who’s life has been negatively affected by their drinking habits.

       I wonder how many people reading this could think of one, two or more situations where alcohol has caused them problems, whether it is missing work, arguing with a friend … suddenly alcoholism becomes a lot more relatable.

If you do think you have a problem, please consult with your GP. Even if it’s just a precaution.

 


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